Maryland Holds the Line on Property Tax Rate; But Buyers Should Consider Total Tax Burden


Recently, the Maryland Board of Public Works voted to keep the state property tax rate at its current level.  The Board is composed of the Governor, Comptroller and State Treasurer.  Governor Larry Hogan, a fiscal conservative, announced that holding the rate was part of his commitment to “prudent capital spending.”  As a result, the state tax rate will remain at 11.2 cents per $100 of assessed value, or 0.112% of total value.  That means a property assessed at $1,000,000 will incur a state tax of $1,120 annually.

While this might suggest good news for Maryland property owners, the state property tax is only a small portion of the overall tax burden on properties.  Each non-exempt property is also subject to county property taxes and, in some jurisdictions, municipal property taxes as well.  For instance, in Montgomery County, a D.C. suburb and the most populated county in the State, the current county tax rate is 0.9927%, which adds another $9,927 in taxes for a $1,000,000 assessment.  Further, a person owning property in Takoma Park, located inside Montgomery County and on the D.C. border, would pay an additional municipal tax of 0.5291.  Consequently, a non-exempt property assessed at $1,000,000 in Takoma Park is subject to a total property tax rate of 1.6338%, equaling $16,338 in annual property taxes.

Other Maryland municipalities that impose a third layer of property taxes include Frederick City (0.73%), Hyattsville (0.63%), and Annapolis (0.54%). When considering the location and timing of purchasing property in the Maryland, buyers should consider the total property taxes imposed annually.  Moreover, if the pre-purchase assessment is lower than the purchase price, the buyer can generally expect the assessment to increase up to the purchase price for the next triennial assessment cycle. The local assessment offices track sales of properties and will pick up the sale price when issuing new assessments.

Miller, Miller & Canby has been challenging the assessments of various types of properties in Maryland for more than 30 years and has obtained substantial reductions in real property assessments for our clients. We have successfully appealed the assessments on office buildings, retail stores, senior living centers, warehouses, industrial sites, casinos, apartment buildings, golf courses and cemeteries. 
Michael Campbell
 is a partner in the litigation group at Miller, Miller & Canby.  In addition to trial and appellate advocacy, his practice focuses on real estate litigation and property tax assessment appeals.  Please feel free to contact Mr. Campbell at 301.762.5212 or send him an email for property tax guidance or to help reduce your commercial Maryland property tax assessment.  For more information about the firm’s Maryland property tax appeals practice and representative cases, click here.





Should Maryland Commercial Property Owners Complete Tax Questionnaires?


Every year, the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation (SDAT) is tasked with reassessing one-third of all commercial properties in the state.  In the year prior to the reassessment, SDAT is required to obtain income and expense information from the property owner.  The information allows the assessor to determine the value of the property using an income approach.  This approach determines value by taking gross income (e.g., rent, CAM reimbursements and other income), applying a vacancy rate and deducting property-related expenses such as maintenance, repairs, utilities, insurance, professional fees (attorney or accountant) and management fees.  The resulting net operating income (NOI) is then divided by an appropriate capitalization rate to reach a final value.

Types of SDAT Property Questionnaires
There are several different types of questionnaires issued by SDAT, each tailored to the type of property being reassessed.  These include apartments, hotels, assisted living facilities, nursing homes, cemeteries, garages and parking lots, mobile home parks, marinas, golf courses and commercial/industrial properties.  The owner is asked to complete the questionnaire and return it to the local Assessment Office by May 15.  

Are Property Tax Questionnaire Submissions Mandatory?
Property owners often inquire whether the submission of the questionnaire is mandatory, and what happens if the questionnaire is not returned.  The answer depends upon the value of the property.  For income-producing property that has a value in excess of $5,000,000, as listed on the assessment roll, the owner is subject to a statutory penalty for failing to produce the information.  The penalty is $100 per day up to a maximum equal to 0.1% of the value of the property.  For instance, a property assessed at $6,000,000 would be subject to a penalty up to $6,000 for the failure to submit the competed questionnaire.

Despite the statutory mandate, there can be instances where the property owner would rather incur a penalty than submit income and expense information to SDAT.  A classic example is where the property is under-assessed by a large margin and submission of the income information would likely cause a significant increase in the assessment. Conversely, a property owner who is not required to submit a questionnaire might want to do so in certain situations. In this instance, the property may be over-assessed and the income and expense information will educate the assessor and likely lead to a reduction in the assessment.

What Should Owner-Occupied Properties Submit?
For properties that are owner-occupied, there is no stream of rental income to report to SDAT.  In this situation, the owner should return the questionnaire without inserting the income and expense data and simply note: “Owner-Occupied.”  The Assessment Office will then estimate market rent and expenses in order to conduct an income approach to value. Occasionally, an owner will have a “friendly lease” with itself or a closely related entity that holds title to the property.  Since this is not an arms-length lease, the rental income should not be reported on the questionnaire because it is unlikely to reflect fair market rent.

Miller, Miller & Canby has been challenging the assessments of various types of properties in Maryland for more than 30 years and has obtained substantial reductions in real property assessments for our clients. We have successfully appealed the assessments on office buildings, retail stores, senior living centers, warehouses, industrial sites, casinos, apartment buildings, golf courses and cemeteries.  

Michael Campbell
is a partner in the litigation group at Miller, Miller & Canby.  In addition to trial and appellate advocacy, his practice focuses on real estate litigation and property tax assessment appeals.  Please feel free to contact Mr. Campbell at 301.762.5212 or send him an email for property tax guidance or to help reduce your commercial Maryland property tax assessment.  For more information about the firm’s Maryland property tax appeals practice and representative cases, click here.





Property Owners Have Until Early February to Appeal New Maryland Property Tax Assessments


At the end of December, the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation (SDAT) issued new Assessment Notices to owners of one-third of all commercial and residential properties in Maryland.  For instance, in Montgomery County, commercial properties in Silver Spring and Wheaton were reassessed.  In Frederick County, commercial properties in Urbana and parts of Ijamsville and Frederick were reassessed.  In Prince George’s County, commercial properties in Greenbelt, College Park, Hyattsville, Oxon Hill, Temple Hills and Riverdale were reassessed.

Property owners have 45 days from the date of the Assessment Notice to challenge these new assessments.  Based on the notices we have seen this cycle, the appeal deadline is February 11, 2019, although this could vary depending upon the notice date.  The “first-level” appeal takes place at the local Assessment Office.  If the assessor refuses to reduce the assessment, the owner may file a further appeal to the county’s Property Tax Assessment Appeals Board (PTAAB).   This Board will consider the evidence and issue a written decision, usually within two weeks.  If the property owner is still dissatisfied, another appeal may be filed to the Maryland Tax Court.

Miller, Miller & Canby has been challenging the assessments of various types of properties in Maryland for more than 30 years and has obtained substantial reductions in real property assessments for our clients.  Our litigation attorneys regularly represent clients before the local Assessment Office, PTAAB and the Maryland Tax Court.  We have successfully appealed the assessments on office buildings, retail stores, senior living centers, warehouses, industrial sites, casinos, apartment buildings and cemeteries.  Let us help you reduce your Maryland property assessments in 2019.

Michael Campbel
l is a partner in the litigation group at Miller, Miller & Canby.  In addition to trial and appellate advocacy, his practice focuses on real estate litigation and property tax assessment appeals.  Please feel free to contact Mr. Campbell at 301.762.5212 or send him an email for property tax guidance or to help reduce your commercial Maryland property tax assessment.  For more information about the firm’s Maryland property tax appeals practice and representative cases, click here.
 





Deadline Approaching to Reduce Property Taxes in Maryland


All properties in Maryland are assessed on a three-year tax cycle. If an appeal is not filed at the beginning of the cycle, a property owner loses the right to challenge the full three-year cycle but may still appeal the assessment for the remaining years. This appeal deadline is December 31. By filing a petition for review, a property owner can have a State assessor review whether a reduction is warranted. Typical grounds for requesting a reduction include tenant vacancies, decreases in rental income, sales of comparable properties at reduced values, and elimination of structures or improvements. An appeal might also be warranted where the owner simply missed the February deadline to appeal the assessment for the full three-year cycle.

At the end of December, the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation (SDAT) will issue new assessment notices to owners of one-third of all commercial and residential properties in Maryland. In Montgomery County, commercial properties in Kensington, Silver Spring and Wheaton will be reassessed. In Frederick County, commercial properties in Urbana, Ijamsville and parts of Frederick will be reassessed, while in Prince George’s County commercial properties in Greenbelt, College Park, Hyattsville and Riverdale can expect new assessments. Property owners have 45 days from the date of the assessment notice to challenge these new assessments.  

Miller, Miller & Canby has been challenging the assessments of various types of properties in Maryland for more than 30 years and has obtained substantial reductions in real property assessments for our clients. We have successfully appealed the assessments on office buildings, retail stores, senior living centers, warehouses, industrial sites, casinos, apartment buildings, golf courses and cemeteries.  

Michael Campbell is a partner in the litigation group at Miller, Miller & Canby.  In addition to trial and appellate advocacy, his practice focuses on real estate litigation and property tax assessment appeals.  Please feel free to contact Mr. Campbell at 301.762.5212 or send him an email for property tax guidance or to help reduce your commercial Maryland property tax assessment.  For more information about the firm’s Maryland property tax appeals practice and representative cases, click here.
 





MM&C Attorneys James Thompson and Jody Kline Honored for the 13th Year as Best Lawyers in America


Best Lawyers® released the 25th Edition of Best Lawyers in America on August 15, 2018. Miller, Miller & Canby’s Jim Thompson and Jody Kline have been recognized on the Best Lawyers list in their respective areas of practice every year since first being named in 2007. Mr. Thompson has been recognized for Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law and Mr. Kline for Land Use and Zoning Law. In 2013, Mr. Thompson was also named a “Best Lawyer of the Year” for his accomplishments. This prestigious award is a testament to their long-standing reputations for their individual legal abilities and professionalism.  

Jim Thompson has been a leader in Miller, Miller & Canby's Litigation Group for more than 35 years, concentrating his practice in eminent domain (with partner Joe Suntum) and in real estate valuation litigation, as well as in property tax assessment appeals (with partner Mike Campbell) and general civil litigation. For more than a decade, Mr. Thompson represented Maryland as the sole member in the Owners’ Counsel of America, a national network of property rights attorneys with demonstrated excellence in this area, focusing upon the representation of landowners in eminent domain litigation. Currently Mr. Suntum is the selected member for the state of Maryland. With Mr. Thompson’s breadth of legal experience, proven results, mature judgment, and tenured leadership within the judicial system and the bar, having served as president of the Maryland State Bar Association, he brings the ideal blend of proven trial experience and legal skill to client representations.

Jody Kline has led Miller, Miller & Canby’s Land Development department since 1981, focusing his practice in land use, zoning and subdivision law and representing clients in many of Montgomery County’s planning and economic development initiatives. In addition to zoning and subdivision law, he represents clients in matters related to master planning, zoning text amendments, conditional use permits, building permit issuance, and other administrative and real estate matters related to land use and development. His clients include residential and commercial developers, private individuals, religious institutions, private schools, non-profit entities and municipal corporations and agencies.

Best Lawyers® is the oldest and most respected attorney ranking service in the world. For more than 30 years, the organization as assisted those in need of legal services to identify the attorneys best qualified to represent them in distant jurisdictions or unfamiliar specialties. Best Lawyers lists are published in leading local, regional, and national publications across the globe.

For more information about Jim Thompson and Miller, Miller & Canby’s Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law practice click here or for information about Jody Kline and Miller, Miller & Canby's Land Use and Zoning Law practice click here. View the firm press release by clicking the Download button below.





Michael Campbell Selected President-Elect of American Inns of Court for Montgomery County


Miller, Miller & Canby Litigation Attorney Michael Campbell was nominated and selected as President-Elect of the Montgomery County Chapter of the American Inns of Court.  Mr. Campbell currently serves as Treasurer of the chapter and will begin his term as President in June 2019.  The American Inns of Court is a national association of lawyers, judges and other legal professionals who share a passion for legal excellence.  Through monthly meetings, the chapter hosts a dinner followed by a presentation, demonstration or guest speaker.  In this collegial environment, outside the courtroom and pressure of daily practice, members discuss legal practice, principals and methods and provide mentorship to new lawyers.

Michael Campbell is a partner in the litigation group at Miller, Miller & Canby. In addition to trial and appellate advocacy, his practice focuses on real estate litigation and property tax assessment appeals.  Please feel free to contact Mr. Campbell at 301.762.5212 or send him an email for litigation matters.  For more information about the firm’s litigation practice, click here.
 





Maryland Property Tax News: Tax Court Determines Value of Casino Land in Case of First Impression


In a case of first impression, the Maryland Tax Court recently considered how to value property subject to a 99-year ground lease with a percentage rent arrangement.   The unusual property tax case involved a lease that was entered into by a casino operator and shopping mall owner, in which the casino was responsible for the property taxes.  Casinos are highly regulated entities in Maryland, with operators required to obtain approval from the Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Commission and pay a large licensing fee.

 Under the ground lease, the casino was required to pay fixed minimum annual rent plus a variable 1% of annual  gross revenues (known as “percentage rent”) generated from gaming and retail sales.  The issue before the court was whether the ground lease should be used as the measure to assess fair market value of the land for ad valorem tax purposes.  The State argued that the lease must be relied upon under an income approach to value.  The casino argued that the ground lease could not be relied upon at all due to its connection to casino revenues.  Instead, the casino urged the court to utilize the sales comparable approach as the only reliable measure of land value.

In analyzing the issue, the Tax Court reviewed Maryland and Federal law related to valuing property subject to leases.  The general rule is that an assessor must consider the effect of a lease on valuation, but it should not be the controlling document in assessing value.  In this case, it was especially true because the ground lease was not a good indicator of property value for these reasons:

  1. The percentage rent provision in the ground lease was speculative and the revenue unknown at the time of execution; and

  2. Including percentage rent in an income approach risks valuing property based on business value instead of property value. Here, approximately two-thirds of the ground rent was derived from the casino business as percentage rent. 

The Maryland Tax Court held that such business income was not indicative of property value, particularly since the property cannot be freely sold in its current use due to the special licensing arrangement with the State.   

In rejecting the States reliance on an income approach using the ground lease, the Tax Court turned to the casino’s appraisal using a sales comparison approach.  The appraisal report listed sales of other properties on which casinos were ultimately constructed – Horseshoe Casino in Baltimore City and the MGM National Harbor Casino on Prince George’s County.   The court deemed that sales are the best indicator of land value for the subject property and reduced the land assessment by a whopping $71M for the 2011 tax cycle and $70M for the 2013 tax cycle, which resulted in a massive tax savings for the casino.  The case is PPE Casino Resorts Maryland LLC vs. Supervisor of Assessments of Anne Arundel County, Case Nos. 14-RP-AA-0503 (1-2) and 14-RP-AA-1276.

Miller, Miller & Canby has been handling assessment appeals of various types of commercial properties in Maryland for more than 30 years.  In 2016, we obtained over $20,000,000 in property assessment reductions for our clients.  Our litigation attorneys regularly represent clients at the assessor level, before the Property Tax Assessment Appeals Board (PTAAB) and in the Maryland Tax Court.  We have successfully appealed the assessments on office buildings, hotels, casinos, retail stores, industrial sites, warehouses, apartment buildings and land at various stages of development.  

Michael Campbell is a partner in the litigation group at Miller, Miller & Canby. In addition to trial and appellate advocacy, his practice focuses on real estate litigation and property tax assessment appeals.  Please feel free to contact Mr. Campbell at 301.762.5212 or send him an email for property tax guidance.  For more information about the firm’s Maryland property tax appeals practice and representative cases, click here.





Property Owners Have 45 Days to Appeal New Maryland Property Tax Assessments


Last week, the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation (SDAT) issued new Assessment Notices to owners of one-third of all commercial and residential properties in Maryland.  For instance, in Montgomery County, commercial properties in Rockville and Gaithersburg were reassessed.  In Frederick County, commercial properties in Ijamsville, Emmitsburg, Thurmont and portions of Frederick were reassessed.  In Prince George’s County, commercial properties in Bladensburg, District Heights, Landover, Lanham and Suitland were reassessed.

Property owners have 45 days from the date of the Assessment Notice to challenge these new assessments.  The “first-level” appeal takes place at the local Assessment Office.  If the assessor refuses to reduce the assessment, the owner may file a further appeal to the county Property Tax Assessment Appeals Board (PTAAB).   This Board will consider the evidence and issue a written decision, usually within two weeks.  If the property owner is still dissatisfied, another appeal may be filed to the Maryland Tax Court.

Miller, Miller & Canby has been challenging the assessments of various types of properties in Maryland for more than 30 years and has obtained substantial reductions in real property assessments for our clients.  Our litigation attorneys regularly represent clients before the local Assessment Office, PTAAB and the Maryland Tax Court.  We have successfully appealed the assessments on office buildings, retail stores, senior living centers, warehouses, industrial sites, casinos, apartment buildings and cemeteries.  Let us help you reduce your Maryland property assessments in 2017.  

Michael Campbell
is a partner in the litigation group at Miller, Miller & Canby.  In addition to trial and appellate advocacy, his practice focuses on real estate litigation and property tax assessment appeals.  Please feel free to contact Mr. Campbell at 301.762.5212 or send him an email for property tax guidance or to help reduce your commercial Maryland property tax assessment.  For more information about the firm’s Maryland property tax appeals practice and representative cases, click here.
 





Best Lawyers Releases 2018 List of Honorees, Includes MM&C Attorneys James Thompson and Jody Kline


Best Lawyers® released the 2018 Edition of Best Lawyers in America on September 29, 2017. The stand-alone publication highlights 2,886 lawyers recognized for their top legal talent, along with 103 “Lawyer of the Year” recipients from the Washington D.C. metro area. Additionally, the publication features notable local news and profiles of firms and individuals across the region.

Best Lawyers in America will be mailed to recognized lawyers in the Washington, D.C. metro area. The publication will also be distributed in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and the Washington Post in the Washington, D.C. metro area.

Miller, Miller & Canby’s Jim Thompson and Jody Kline have been recognized on the Best Lawyers list in their respective areas of practice every year since first being named in 2007. Mr. Thompson has been recognized for Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law and Mr. Kline for Land Use and Zoning Law. In 2013, Mr. Thompson was also named a “Best Lawyer of the Year” for his accomplishments. This prestigious award is a testament to their long-standing reputations for their individual legal abilities and professionalism.  

Jim Thompson
has been a leader in Miller, Miller & Canby's Litigation Group for more than 35 years, concentrating his practice in eminent domain (with partner Joe Suntum) and in real estate valuation litigation, as well as in property tax assessment appeals and general civil litigation. For more than a decade, Mr. Thompson represented Maryland as the sole member in the Owners’ Counsel of America, a national network of property rights attorneys with demonstrated excellence in this area, focusing upon the representation of landowners in eminent domain litigation. Currently Mr. Suntum is the selected member for the state of Maryland. With Mr. Thompson’s breadth of legal experience, proven results, mature judgment, and tenured leadership within the judicial system and the bar, having served as president of the Maryland State Bar Association, he brings the ideal blend of proven trial experience and legal skill to client representations.

Jody Kline
has led Miller, Miller & Canby’s Land Development department since 1981, focusing his practice in land use, zoning and subdivision law and representing clients in many of Montgomery County’s planning and economic development initiatives. In addition to zoning and subdivision law, he represents clients in matters related to master planning, zoning text amendments, conditional use permits, building permit issuance, and other administrative and real estate matters related to land use and development. His clients include residential and commercial developers, private individuals, religious institutions, private schools, non-profit entities and municipal corporations and agencies.

"For more than a third of a century," says Best Lawyers CEO Steven Naifeh, "Best Lawyers has been the gold standard of excellence in the legal profession." President Phil Greer adds, "We are extremely proud of that record and equally proud to acknowledge the accomplishments of these exceptional legal professionals."

Best Lawyers® is the oldest and most respected attorney ranking service in the world. For more than 30 years, the organization as assisted those in need of legal services to identify the attorneys best qualified to represent them in distant jurisdictions or unfamiliar specialties. Best Lawyers lists are published in leading local, regional, and national publications across the globe.

For more information about Jim Thompson and Miller, Miller & Canby’s Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law practice click here or for information about Jody Kline and Miller, Miller & Canby's Land Use and Zoning Law practice click here.

 





Four MM&C Attorneys Named 2017 DC Super Lawyers


Miller, Miller & Canby is pleased to announce our attorneys who have been named to the list of Super Lawyers in the D.C. Metropolitan area for 2017. Attorneys James Thompson, Jody Kline and Donna McBride have been selected for this honor, and attorney Diane Feuerherd has been named to the 2017 Rising Stars list, which recognizes attorneys under the age of 40.

Each year, Super Lawyers recognizes the top lawyers in the nation’s capital through a patented multiphased selection process which involves independent research, as well as peer nomination and review/evaluation. The objective is to create a comprehensive listing of exceptional attorneys to be used as a resource for both referring attorneys and consumers seeking legal counsel. Attorneys are selected from more than 70 practice areas and a variety of firm sizes. The lists are published annually in leading city and regional magazines and newspapers nationwide.

2017 marks the 11th year that James (Jim) Thompson has been named to the list. Jim has been a leader in Miller, Miller & Canby’s Litigation Group for more than 35 years, concentrating his practice in eminent domain (with partner Joe Suntum) and in real estate valuation litigation, as well as in property tax assessment appeals and general civil litigation. For more than a decade, he represented Maryland as the sole member in the Owner’s Counsel of America, a national network of property rights attorneys with demonstrated excellence in this area, focusing upon the representation of landowners in eminent domain litigation.

Jody Kline
has been a named Super Lawyer for each of the past 10 years, and has led Miller, Miller & Canby’s Land Development and Zoning practice group since 1981. He focuses his practice in land use, zoning and subdivision law, and representing clients in many of Montgomery County’s planning and economic development initiatives. Additionally, he represents clients in matters relating to master planning, zoning text amendments, conditional use permits, building permit issuance, and other matters related to land use and development. His clients include residential and commercial developers, institutions, municipal corporations and entities, private schools, non-profit entities and private individuals.

Donna McBride
has been a named Super Lawyer since 2014, and has been a partner in Miller, Miller & Canby’s Litigation practice since 2009. She focuses her practice in litigation in the following areas:  business and commercial, employment, estates and trusts, personal injury and insurance, as well as real estate. In addition to her extensive background as a trial lawyer, she is co-chair of the Maryland State Bar Association’s Judicial Selections Committee, served on the Character Committee for the Court of Appeals, serves on the Executive Committee for the Montgomery County Bar Association and on the Standing Committee on Rules of Practice and Procedure for the Court of Appeals of Maryland.

2017 is the second year that attorney Diane Feuerherd has been named to the Super Lawyers “Rising Stars” list. She is an associate in Miller, Miller & Canby’s Litigation practice, focusing in appellate, employment, commercial and business litigation. She has successfully argued cases before the Court of Special Appeals and the Court of Appeals and represented a commercial developer challenging the validity of the Montgomery County “Rain Tax.” She contributes her time to the Finding Justice project, a committee of the Women’s Bar Association, researching and memorializing the history of women lawyers in Maryland.  

Click the download button below to view the firm's formal press release. View the entire 2017 DC Super Lawyers by clicking here.





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